Florida Highwaymen paintings

THE Florida Highwaymen ON EXHIBItion Wednesday, July 3rd from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM At the Palmetto Historical Park and Manatee County Agricultural Museum

On Wednesday, July 3rd from 11:00 AM to 1:00 PM, the Palmetto Historical Park and Manatee County Agricultural Museum will open a Florida Highwaymen Art Exhibit with a reception. This reception is free and open to the public, light bites will be served. The exhibit can be seen in the Palmetto Historical Park's Carnegie Library and Manatee County Agricultural Museum.  Click here to RSVP!

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Sam Newton

Fire Sky oil on masonite 16” x 20” $1350 - SOLD!

From the very beginning of his painting career, Sam concentrated on making quality paintings. He began using professional artist’s supplies such as canvas, as opposed to Upson board, early in his career. Being recognized as an artist has always been more important to Sam than becoming a wheeler-dealer salesman. In order to produce paintings he is proud to sign as his, he paints slowly, paying careful attention to composition, color, and details. His works are crisp and clear, with great attention to the way a landscape looks. They are more about reality than an impression.


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John Maynor

Backwater Sunrise oil on board 20” x 16” $1200

John Maynor’s paintings are distinguished by the texture in his trees, which he built up with a palette knife. He liked to paint fiery skies and he made his waterways shine by giving them a coat of linseed oil. His work was all about creating an atmosphere. When asked how he knew when he’s created a good painting, he replied that he knows it when it sells.


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Robert Butler

Everglades Marsh oil on canvas 11” x 14” $1380

It is best to understand Robert’s relationship to the land in his own words. In 2012, he wrote: “Strikingly beautiful, the Kissimmee River was my source of constant inspiration, just as the beaches were for the coastal Highwaymen during all the years that I lived in the region. Its windswept, black waters sparkled at midday, evoking visions of timeless vistas where droves of birds sailed the warm winds above. I would often take long walks before or after work and fish along the levee that contained the river after the early 1960s. My favorite time was at daybreak when I would imagine myself suspended in a Salvador Dali world where huge flights of white egrets silently passed overhead as if steered to some mysterious destination known only to nature.” 

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James gibson

Untitled oil on masonite 11” x 14” $1020

James Gibson’s early work was monochromatic, possibly because painting with fewer colors allowed him to produce work more quickly. In the 1990s, his landscapes became more colorful and he became astute at mixing colors and using a palette knife. He started visualizing a painting before he began and, like Bean Backus before him, the work seemed to go better with a good piece of music playing. In 1999, Gibson described his paintings this way: “I’m on the style of Mr. Backus. See, one reason I’m on that style is because I love Backus’ paintings. I don’t want to paint like him. In other words, I want to get what he’s thought into paintings. That’s a good feeling you know.”


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R.L. Lewis

Purple Flamboyant oil on stretched masonite 16” x 20” $960

An artistic steward of our environment. Robert Lewis’ subject matter is more extensive than most of the other Highwaymen. Besides lush landscapes, he paints cows, deer, dogs, cowboys, birds, and buildings. His range of foliage is diverse and he sometimes paints still lifes. He likes to work in series. For example, he might do several paintings on turtles or a group of paintings on a specific place such as Oakland, Florida. He often does commissioned work. People come to him with a photo or two and ask him to paint their prized cow or their ranch. Mostly, his work is associated with preservation efforts. He was once asked to paint a seascape of an area on the west coast of Florida that was threatened by a shopping center. Encouraging people to save the unspoiled beauty of Florida’s landscape (or for that matter, natural landscape in any state) is one of his primary missions.


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R.L. Lewis

Paynes Prairie oil on canvas 14” x 18” $700

An artistic steward of our environment. Robert Lewis’ subject matter is more extensive than most of the other Highwaymen. Besides lush landscapes, he paints cows, deer, dogs, cowboys, birds, and buildings. His range of foliage is diverse and he sometimes paints still lifes. He likes to work in series. For example, he might do several paintings on turtles or a group of paintings on a specific place such as Oakland, Florida. He often does commissioned work. People come to him with a photo or two and ask him to paint their prized cow or their ranch. Mostly, his work is associated with preservation efforts. He was once asked to paint a seascape of an area on the west coast of Florida that was threatened by a shopping center. Encouraging people to save the unspoiled beauty of Florida’s landscape (or for that matter, natural landscape in any state) is one of his primary missions.


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R.L. Lewis

River Sunrise oil on stretched canvas 18” x 24” $1720

An artistic steward of our environment. Robert Lewis’ subject matter is more extensive than most of the other Highwaymen. Besides lush landscapes, he paints cows, deer, dogs, cowboys, birds, and buildings. His range of foliage is diverse and he sometimes paints still lifes. He likes to work in series. For example, he might do several paintings on turtles or a group of paintings on a specific place such as Oakland, Florida. He often does commissioned work. People come to him with a photo or two and ask him to paint their prized cow or their ranch. Mostly, his work is associated with preservation efforts. He was once asked to paint a seascape of an area on the west coast of Florida that was threatened by a shopping center. Encouraging people to save the unspoiled beauty of Florida’s landscape (or for that matter, natural landscape in any state) is one of his primary missions.


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R.L. Lewis

Banana River Sunrise oil on stretched canvas panel 12” x 24” $960

An artistic steward of our environment. Robert Lewis’ subject matter is more extensive than most of the other Highwaymen. Besides lush landscapes, he paints cows, deer, dogs, cowboys, birds, and buildings. His range of foliage is diverse and he sometimes paints still lifes. He likes to work in series. For example, he might do several paintings on turtles or a group of paintings on a specific place such as Oakland, Florida. He often does commissioned work. People come to him with a photo or two and ask him to paint their prized cow or their ranch. Mostly, his work is associated with preservation efforts. He was once asked to paint a seascape of an area on the west coast of Florida that was threatened by a shopping center. Encouraging people to save the unspoiled beauty of Florida’s landscape (or for that matter, natural landscape in any state) is one of his primary missions.

 

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R.l. Lewis

Backwater Sunset oil on canvas 8” x 10” $250 - SOLD!

An artistic steward of our environment. Robert Lewis’ subject matter is more extensive than most of the other Highwaymen. Besides lush landscapes, he paints cows, deer, dogs, cowboys, birds, and buildings. His range of foliage is diverse and he sometimes paints still lifes. He likes to work in series. For example, he might do several paintings on turtles or a group of paintings on a specific place such as Oakland, Florida. He often does commissioned work. People come to him with a photo or two and ask him to paint their prized cow or their ranch. Mostly, his work is associated with preservation efforts. He was once asked to paint a seascape of an area on the west coast of Florida that was threatened by a shopping center. Encouraging people to save the unspoiled beauty of Florida’s landscape (or for that matter, natural landscape in any state) is one of his primary missions.

 

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al black

Wetland Landscape oil on board 24” x 36” $980

Change for the better. Al Black may be remembered as the best salesman of all the Highwaymen. His ability to charm a prospective customer or journalist, even while you know you may be hearing exaggerations, is what marks his personality. He readily draws you in with his stories, and most people who meet him report that he is surprisingly likeable, in spite of his somewhat questionable former lifestyle. Al is an exceptionally talented artist who found the Lord Jesus Christ in prison—along with a renewed desire to paint. The three flying birds he places in his landscapes, signifying the Trinity, it is the best way to identify Al Black’s paintings, along with the subtlety of hope, optimism and beauty in its subject. He paints traditional Highwaymen subject matter: rivers, beaches, waves, sunsets, and varying kinds of foliage.


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al Black

Cypress Backwater oil on canvas panel 14” x 18” $720

Change for the better. Al Black may be remembered as the best salesman of all the Highwaymen. His ability to charm a prospective customer or journalist, even while you know you may be hearing exaggerations, is what marks his personality. He readily draws you in with his stories, and most people who meet him report that he is surprisingly likeable, in spite of his somewhat questionable former lifestyle. Al is an exceptionally talented artist who found the Lord Jesus Christ in prison—along with a renewed desire to paint. The three flying birds he places in his landscapes, signifying the Trinity, it is the best way to identify Al Black’s paintings, along with the subtlety of hope, optimism and beauty in its subject. He paints traditional Highwaymen subject matter: rivers, beaches, waves, sunsets, and varying kinds of foliage.


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Al Black

Moonlit Riverscape oil on board 24” x 36” $980

 Change for the better. Al Black may be remembered as the best salesman of all the Highwaymen. His ability to charm a prospective customer or journalist, even while you know you may be hearing exaggerations, is what marks his personality. He readily draws you in with his stories, and most people who meet him report that he is surprisingly likeable, in spite of his somewhat questionable former lifestyle. Al is an exceptionally talented artist who found the Lord Jesus Christ in prison—along with a renewed desire to paint. The three flying birds he places in his landscapes, signifying the Trinity, it is the best way to identify Al Black’s paintings, along with the subtlety of hope, optimism and beauty in its subject. He paints traditional Highwaymen subject matter: rivers, beaches, waves, sunsets, and varying kinds of foliage.


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Palmetto Art Center

907 5th Street West, Palmetto, Florida 34221, United States

(941) 518 - 2109